Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘poetry’ Category

 

 

 

Image

Who pedals the wheels of time to ov’rturn

Glory of man gone to rack and ruin?

The titles and honors he had amassed

Are laid a-heap left for the worms to scorn.

benny

Read Full Post »

 

 Image

 

Quatrain#11 Now Voyager

 

We are lost on this great sea of living

We seek no port or care where we’re heading:

Love, you and I as we make the landfall

Seek not the past nor what future will bring.((First ed.)

 

Read Full Post »

Season’s Greetings

Thorough night or day

In sickness or health,

In being poor or rich

I know day follows night:

What is night but the gleam of light

Waiting to be let in?

Let your hearts with love and light surround,

If only you see the daybreak

Comes in a shower of blessings,-

I wish you all these and much more

But I shall not this blessed day sound a bore.

benny                                                                                                                 

Read Full Post »

And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field,keeping watch over their flock by night.” Lk:2:8

O Starry bright! I would that host of angels
Carol in their clearest tones tidings of Peace.
Long day it was! Oh how dull of hearing grown
While pall of darkness covers e’en our eyes as well-
Tarry no more! Waken us from our slumber
Jesus needs be born in our hearts once again,
This night we are up, quicken us as before
We tend our flocks for wild beasts, our labor in vain
O Night, O Holy Night, O Night divine
O Night, O Holy Night, O Night divine

Dress our sky,with beacons of hope,declare
The Star has risen for us, life abundant.
The child in manger shall preserve the life of man:
His golden rod shall lift the weak and poor,
His Word cast down the ramparts of evil pride,
How sublime the king of kings has thus shown!
For rest chose he not a kingly bed of ease
But the starry vault of heav’n, Shine on stars
O Night, O Holy Night , O Night divine!
O Night, O Holy Night , O Night divine!
benny

Read Full Post »

Quatrain#41

 

Your voice like strings plucked, and words

You intone give new meaning to the bards;

By your loveliness surround we may yet

Transported anywhere, a-winging like birds.

 

Read Full Post »

Quatrain#39

 

Gone are those Movers and Shakers of yore

They had their day and shall trouble us no more;

Let Rustom holler or Hatim Tai plead,

Never mind- They are all in death done for.

Read Full Post »

 

 

Of the very substance,- Ah dust I am,

Veiled, the light of wisdom is but dim:

Its sovereign rays penetrate however,

Dispers’d through my sentient flesh, a prism.

 

Read Full Post »

 

As key to lock is Night to Light without;

It is all in context my dear sirs: Doubt

Profound shall not measure up to the pith

Of divine purpose nor Will cancel out.

Read Full Post »

Love I can well understand: it is fine

My world is lit up anew by the word.

Many a bard has for inspiration

Sought and found love sublime their motherlode;

Who shall blame Romeo or fair Juliet

If love did pour such glorious music?

It is a flame fanned to such a height

Truth of what follows is not what we seek.

Put out the light, O Moor and with bare hands

Kill the green eyed monster, if you dare!

We miss truth when love is less than it sounds

Love we sound so loud, but truth do we care?

Love is sublime and we cannot but seek:

Truth is we are worn down by what we seek.

 benny

Read Full Post »

Pen Portraits- William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth(-1770-1850) Poet Laureate
William enjoyed hiking: during the “long” (i.e., summer) vacation of 1788 he tramped around Cumberland county;and two years later went on a walking tour of France, Switzerland, and Germany; and in 1791, he was back in France full of enthusiasm for a new world order which he saw was in the making of the French Revolution. The ardent idealist had an affair with a girl and left her and his child behind. He stayed put in England through convulsions of the Reign of Terror.
In 1794 he was reunited with his sister Dorothy, who became his companion, close friend, moral support, and housekeeper until her physical and mental decline in the 1830s. The next year he met Coleridge, and the three of them grew very close, the two men meeting daily in 1797-98 to talk about poetry and to plan Lyrical Ballads, which came out in 1798. The three friends travelled to Germany that fall, a trip that produced intellectual stimulation for Coleridge and homesickness for Wordsworth. After their return, William and Dorothy settled in his beloved Lake district, near Grasmere.

The Peace of Amiens in 1802 allowed Wordsworth and his sister to visit France again to see Annette and Caroline. They arrived at a mutually agreeable settlement, and a few months later, after receiving an inheritance owed by Lord Lonsdale since John Wordsworth’s death in 1783, William married Mary Hutchinson.
He parted with Coleridge in 1810 and on the home front was not free from tragedy- he lost two children in 1812. In 1813 Wordsworth received an appointment as Distributor of Stamps for Westmorland, and the £400 per year which went with this post made him financially secure.
Wordsworth’s literary career began with Descriptive Sketches (1793) and reached an early climax before the turn of the century, with Lyrical Ballads. His powers peaked with Poems in Two Volumes (1807), and his reputation continued to grow; even his harshest reviewers recognized his popularity and the originality. During his lifetime he refused to print The Prelude, which he had completed by 1805, because he thought it was unprecedented for a poet to talk as much about himself — unless he could put it in its proper setting.Inspiration gradually failed him for this project, and he spent much of his later life revising The Prelude. Critics quarrel about which version is better, the 1805 or the 1850, but agree that in either case it is the most successful blank verse epic since Paradise Lost.

Finally fully reconciled to Coleridge, the two of them toured the Rhineland in 1828. When Robert Southey died in 1843, Wordsworth was named Poet Laureate. He died in 1850, and his wife published the much-revised Prelude that summer.
(ack:William Wordsworth: Biography-Glenn Everett, Associate Professor of English, University of Tennessee at Martin/www.the Victorian Web)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,511 other followers