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This Japanese film (Banshun in Japanese) is the second of post-war productions from Yasujirō Ozu. Unlike the other famous and more well known to international audience Akira Kurosawa, he prefers to work on much a simpler scale. Yasujiro Ozu is the most Japanese of Japan’s filmmakers, who dispenses with an elaborate plot or action to keep the viewer’s attention. Kurosawa may keep several cameras rolling simultaneously to give his actions fluidity or let them leap past picture frame as in Seven Samurai while Ozu’s camera remains three feet above the floor: he, with his subjective camera technique prompts the viewer to see his films from a Japanese perspective. According to film critic Iwasaki Akira,’ The Japanese people spend their lives seated on ‘tatami’ mattings spread over the floor;…therefore the eye of the camera also must be at this level.’ (“Yasujirō Ozu”, Film No 36, Summer 1963,p.9) Before I pass over to the plot and other matters I think his films uphold typically a Japanese virtue of ‘less is more.’ Like Sho, Japanese calligraphy there is a natural balance in both the characters and the composition as a whole’.
The plot is simple: There is a deep bond between a widowed father and his daughter who is ‘in her late spring.’ Does he let her serve his needs longer or give her away in marriage while there is time? It is based on Father and Daughter by Kazuo Hirotsu.
The story concerns Noriko, who lives happily with her widowed father and seems in no hurry to get married. Her father, a professor, however, wants to see her settled and conspires with his sister to trick Noriko into pursuing an arranged marriage. Not wishing to see the girl resign herself to spinsterhood, Shukuchi   ( Chisu Ryu) pretends that he himself is about to be married. Obvious in a middle-class home with such small living space as In Japan there will be no room for her, thus forcing her to seek comfort and joy elsewhere. It is cruel to be pushed out of the family nest but love sometimes must be made of sterner stuff. Chisu Ryu was faultless as the father whose emotions always struck the right note as one who could warm up to the affection of his selfless daughter and equally show his concern at the way she was turning herself in the process into a aged spinster. The film stars Setsuko Hara, in her first of many collaborations with Ozu.
Directed by     Yasujirō Ozu
Produced by     Shochiku Films Ltd.
Written by     Kazuo Hirotsu
Kôgo Noda
Yasujiro Ozu
Music by     Senji Itô
Cinematography     Yuuharu Atsuta
Running time     108 min.

Cast

Chishu Ryu … Shukichi Somiya
Setsuko Hara … Noriko Somiya
Yumeji Tsukioka … Aya Kitagawa
Haruko Sugimura … Masa Taguchi
Hohi Aoki … Katsuyoshi
Jun Usami … Shuichi Hattori

Similar Movies
Tokyo Story  (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
Early Summer  (1951, Yasujiro Ozu)
Movies with the Same Personnel
Early Summer  (1951, Yasujiro Ozu)
Tokyo Story  (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
Late Autumn  (1960, Yasujiro Ozu)
An Autumn Afternoon  (1962, Yasujiro Ozu)
Floating Weeds  (1959, Yasujiro Ozu)
Equinox Flower  (1958, Yasujiro Ozu)
Early Autumn  (1961, Yasujiro Ozu)
Good Morning  (1959, Yasujiro Ozu)
(Allmovie.com)
compiler:benny

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