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Archive for August 14th, 2016

A Brahmin who traced his lineage to Sage Agastya worshipped his ancestor and the Sage one day appeared to him in his dream and said, ‘I have attained moksha and I am past attending to prayers of mortals. But if you must pray and ask for favours, try Mushika Muni, who between you and me shall never reach the lotus feet of the Lord Brahma. But in case of emergency he is the one to put your case.’ Thereafter  Brahmin did everything after praying to the muni.

Mushika Muni was a rat.

The Brahmin worshipped the rat, or rather his golden image. He prospered and he amassed great wealth and he became certain that he was beyond any reproach. He concealed his wealth and he had offshore accounts. One morning the Income Tax authorities raided his premises and they found incriminating evidence of tax evasion. He was not in the least fazed. He smiled when he was asked to come clean. He merely said, “My case is before Mushika Muni. There is nothing you or I can do.”

That night he slept soundly in his own bed; he was under house arrest but that did not disturb his sleep.

In a dream he saw an elephant and he said, ‘ Do not mistake, I was Mushika Muni, in my previous birth. I became elevated to this form. My devotee is the one who must try your case. His prayer has reached me and I am before you to tell this. I am to flatten you under my foot after your case is heard. No hard feelings.’

Appealing to ideas that ancients had accepted as truth are as sound as our Brahmin whose actions were as wrong as his idea that it can remain perfect or constant. Similarly misguided are “salafists”, advocating a return to the ways of the first Muslim ancestors, the salaf al-salih (righteous ancestors)

“No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man”. Heraclitus

benny

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Many hundred years ago there lived an honest old woodcutter and his wife. One fine morning the old man went off to the hills with his billhook, to gather a faggot of sticks, while his wife went down to the river to wash the dirty clothes. When she came to the river, she saw a peach floating down the stream; so she picked it up, and carried it home with her, thinking to give it to her husband to eat when he should come in.

The old man soon came down from the hills, and the good wife set the peach before him, when, just as she was inviting him to eat it, the fruit split in two, and a little puling baby was born into the world. So the old couple took the babe, and brought it up as their own; and, because it had been born in a peach, they called it Momotaro, or Little Peachling.

By degrees Little Peachling grew up to be strong and brave, and at last one day he said to his old foster parents: “I am going to the ogres’ island to carry off the riches that they have stored up there. Pray, then, make me some millet dumplings for my journey.”

So the old folks ground the millet, and made the dumplings for him; and Little Peachling, after taking an affectionate leave of them, cheerfully set out on his travels.

As he was journeying on, he fell in with a monkey, who gibbered at him, and said: “Kia! kia! kia! where are you off to, Little Peachling?”

“I’m going to the ogres’ island, to carry off their treasure,” answered Little Peachling.

“What are you carrying at your girdle?”

“I’m carrying the very best millet dumplings in all Japan.”

“If you’ll give me one, I will go with you,” said the monkey.

So Little Peachling gave one of his dumplings to the monkey, who received it and followed him. When he had gone a little further, he heard a pheasant calling: “Ken! ken! ken! where are you off to, Master Peachling?”

Little Peachling answered as before; and the pheasant, having begged and obtained a millet dumpling, entered his service, and followed him.

A little while after this, they met a dog, who cried: “Bow! wow! wow! whither away, Master Peachling?”

“I’m going off to the ogres’ island, to carry off their treasure.”

“If you will give me one of those nice millet dumplings of yours, I will go with you,” said the dog.

“With all my heart,” said Little Peachling. So he went on his way, with the monkey, the pheasant, and the dog following after him.

When they got to the ogres’ island, the pheasant flew over the castle gate, and the monkey clambered over the castle wall, while Little Peachling, leading the dog, forced in the gate, and got into the castle. Then they did battle with the ogres, and put them to flight, and took their king prisoner. So all the ogres did homage to Little Peachling, and brought out the treasures which they had laid up. There were caps and coats that made their wearers invisible, jewels which governed the ebb and flow of the tide, coral, musk, emeralds, amber, and tortoise shell, besides gold and silver. All these were laid before Little Peachling by the conquered ogres.

Little Peachling would not touch any. He said,” All these presents are good but I would not touch these.”

King of the ogres was amazed. “Didn’t you come in to force out of us, our powers?”

‘Yes’,replied the Peachling. “But now I realize how I came here.” Seeing their bewildered looks he explained how he came floating along the river. “Oh King make all these into some fruit and let it float for others to benefit from.”

Thus under the direction of Little Peachling the Ogre made a peach tree.its boughs heavy with fruits.  He stood there admiring his own work. Plucking one he said, “Ripe little fruit- I shall call this -Mercy!”He added,” But for this we would never have known what kindness is.”As the King let it fall into the river, lo and behold, Peachling instantly changed into a fairy and said,” You prove you are indeed a king! You made me find my true state.”

So Little Peachling flew off and  maintained his foster parents in peace and plenty for the remainder of their lives.

(I changed a little at the end of the story. I trust it doesn’t spoil the story-benny)

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