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Archive for July, 2017

The selection from my work Marginalia explains the nature of God. Does Monotheism or Trinity explain the Lord God truthfully? Why controversy over God whom no one can see (but evidence of Him is so abundantly given throughout the Scripture) if Truth would not change the worshipper to do His commandments with all his heart and mind?. The reason is simple: each faction having presupposed the divine Nature simply want him proved right. Whose glory is on the line here mine or of God?-b  

“Let us now take up the nature of the Trinity.

Think of the Oneness of God as one whole. Why it should yield to the scrutiny of man is not so much as man is well served by the scriptures with regards to his Holiness, the Power and Wisdom. The ‪Trinity testifies the Oneness of God, each supplying necessary details to the whole while the whole in turn testifies these narratives as Truth.

We have in the Bible a few references as to the Lord God. God is a spirit (Jn.4:24). One quality of the spirit is that it can move like the wind (Jn.3:8); similarly nature of fire holds a mysterious quality both of which we can consider to our profit in order to understand the Trinity. The Lord God is a consuming fire (He.12:29). Air and Fire,- both elements we associate with God and yet there is no form that we can hold on to. The Spirit in elucidating the triune God however gives each a recognizable sign. In order to reveal God’s Jealousy we have this instance when the two sons of Aaron are punished (Le.10:1-2). What was their offense? They offered strange fire, which He commanded them not. Swift came their punishment. It brings to our remembrance the warning of the writer to the Hebrews, ‘…Holiness without which no man shall see the Lord (He.12:14).’ Purifying nature of fire being synonymous with holiness the Holy Spirit gives a symbolic value to the aspect of the Trinity.

We read God revealing himself to Abraham as well as to Moses. The presence of God is signified as a burning lamp passing between the animals Abram offered. Also significant is the passage where God was specific as to how it was to presented to him (Ge.15:9). In the burning bush that consumed not we see another manner by which His presence is indicated. Unlike the fire that consumed Nadab and Abihu we see the triune presence of God is associated by the symbol of fire. There is no indication of it being made by human hands. In contrast to this the fourth Man in the fiery furnace is made of man. Subtlety with which the Son of man is presented there is a fitting commentary of God who became man so as to understand various fiery situations we are sometime subjected in our everyday situations.

God is given a shape in the pillar of fire and cloud by day that led the children of Israel in the wilderness. Similarly in the vision of Ezekiel we see the great cloud and a great fire infolding itself,(Ez.1:4).’

In the New Testament God the spirit is given a symbol and a recognizable form as cloven tongues of fire and ‘it sat upon each of them(Ac.2:3)’. God the Spirit while presenting the God document makes a clear distinction in his characteristic style, delineating the personality of each office in the Trinity. The Oneness of the Lord God and those of the Triune God have self same essence while each in their operation quality is distinct.

 

God the Spirit puts both narratives from God the Father and from God the Son into a format where abstract ideas of divine Essence are rendered concrete in the Person and Deity of Jesus Christ. Truth is preserved. (Jn.1: 1)

Does Holy Spirit change the significance of the Will in reorganizing the Scriptural narrative? We shall see from two verses quoted here below which concerns the Holy Spirit. Jesus said ‘Wherefore I say unto you…but the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit shall not be forgiven..’(Mt.12: 31) It is evident from the quote that it is the testimony of God, the Son.

The same verse is similarly repeated which is the divine Will expressed. It is not without significance that view of the Holy Spirit is skipped. We have the testimony of Jesus for it that he ’… shall not speak of himself…’ (Jn.16: 33,8:17) Internal evidence proves the veracity of the Word as set down by Holy Spirit.”

(Selected from Chapter-8 Role of the Spirit/ Marginalia- vol.II

 

Vol.1 148 pages  priced $7.00

Vol-2  265 pages   $14.25

e-books/kindle available priced  vol. 1

120 pages $3.85 vol-2 200 pages $5.06  Amazon/Kobo/Barnes&Noble/google play, Apple i-book etc.,

Benny

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Marginalia, a concise guide to the Bible in two volumes in paperback and Kindle available through Amazon.com

Author: Benny Thomas

The book is the result of the author’s spiritual experience of 70+ years.

How this book can help a Bible Student?

Marginalia helps the reader bear in mind the person and deity of Jesus Christ as holding the centre of gravity of the divine Will so everything else in the Scriptural narrative falls in place as one unified whole. It helps him from being distracted by sideshows which are but a shadow. This makes the role of the Spirit very vital in order to get the best out of the Bible. We have the testimony of Jesus of the role of the Spirit. “He shall glorify me: for he shall receive of mine, and shall shew it unto you (Jn.16: 14)”.

When we speak Father of lights what does that mean? The light of the Son shall have quality of life which is the light of life (Jn.8:12). Similarly Holy Spirit as Inspiration of God instructs each believer into righteousness. He  throws light so the reader can be helped into spirit of truth. His is laser light with which he glorifies role of the Son in the Scripture. The thrust of Marginalia therefore is to throw light on the Bible consequently as from laser than with an ordinary flashlight. In literal interpretation there is a danger of following incoherent light and the number of heresies still current owe to such misreading of the Scripture. With laser light of the Spirit it is hoped that this concise guide shall reveal to the reader the role of Jesus Christ as fulfillment of the Will and the Way to lead them to the rest that God himself has entered.

Finally the author’s faith-based approach is to show the inerrancy of the Bible (1Co.2: 5).

 

Marginalia, a concise guide to the Bible puts up guideposts so a student can safely navigate through the entire Scripture effortlessly. This serves as a Bible Study Help and not a substitute for the word of God.

Vol.1 148 pages  priced $7.00

Vol-2  265 pages   $14.25

e-books/kindle available priced  vol. 1

120 pages $3.85 vol-2 200 pages $5.06  Amazon/Kobo/Barnes&Noble/google play, Apple i-book etc.,

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Philosophy of mathematics

One plus one is two. But when you apply it to a man and woman the answer shall be always what you may not guess. A family can never be pigeonholed into simple arithmetic. What is mathematics then? No one has yet settled about the nature of mathematics.

Mathematics of numbers however are pure. The number pi for example.

In everyday life, we speak as Platonists, treating the objects of our study as real things that exist independently of human thought. If challenged on this, however, we retreat to some sort of formalism, arguing that in fact we are just pushing symbols around without making any metaphysical claims. Most of all, however, we want to do mathematics rather than argue about what it actually is. We’re content to leave that to the philosophers.

There was a time, early in the twentieth century, in which mathematicians were passionately interested in the philosophy of mathematics. People were deeply concerned about what mathematics is, what sort of existence mathematical objects have, and their opinions on these questions actually influenced the mathematics they did.

Mathematics is a human endeavour, and in every day lives we create sets of certainties to account for services we render and consumables we buy so we have a value systems to assure us certain truths of our waking lives. (When the Spirit makes use of numbers it is notable that zero is never used.) As a value system it helps man give an account of his wealth.

Thus we create wealth and set this apart for our pension funds. When we are told all that money is gone what would mean? Does it mean the value we agreed upon coinage or bonds is worthless? It would not mean that our means to accumulate the desired value are cancelled along with it? Mathematical truths are uncertain like any other truths when it is tied to human nature.

A higher truth is what I have dealt with in Marginalia, a concise guide to the Bible. Truth of the word of God is ever fixed.

Marginalia in two volumes is available as e book/kindle version.

First volume has 112 pages and priced at $3.99

Second volume has 200 pages and priced at $5.99

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God as Omnipresent and Omnipotent. His sovereignty over the earth is evident in his creation.

The river from Eden branching into four heads (Ge.2:10) is an illustration. The creation account clearly states that God had not caused it to rain upon the earth (vs.5). The Spirit clues us that not natural causes but God is the Prime Mover. We read in the last book of the Bible :there was ‘a pure river of water of life proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb(Re.22:1)’ and it goes like straight as an arrow. The river from Eden forms four heads compassing different lands.

The number four has significance to which I shall come by and by.

God sets his Will in a series chains of events where man and his actions do count. Adam’s disobedience in eating of the fruit informs us nature is also a component or divine instrument. ‘Cursed is the ground for thy sake.’ Weirder climate and one-percenters of today did not spring out of nothing but are the result of accumulated effect of chains of cause and effect.

In fulfilling divine Will nations of the world are the living canvass wherein man is placed and chains of events are the means to build up his faith or correct him. His individual life shall bear the lights and shadows cast by the immediate context in which he is placed. The example of Ruth amply bears out this truism. During the time the Judges ruled Israel there was a famine. Although Ruth being a Moabite and outside the promise of God made to the House of Israel, she was predestined to glory. She is the matriarch from whose womb the Messianic Promise would stream forth.

The eternal verity of Mercy is unchangeable but His authority is affixed in the many chains of events, too complex for any man to control. In its working we only need compare the role of volcanoes. These are upheavals of the earth causing many hiccups but renewing the face of the earth. God’s sovereignty assures His children the greatest good not according to any time frame of man but in his Time. Sorrows are like the birth pangs a woman undergoes before the birth never thought of once she holds the baby to her bosom. A child of God bonded with God through the redemptive work of the Son never need concern of whatever happens. Ruth suffered her share of misfortunes but when God had put these under the heading of Mercy her case was unlike anything that she had imagined. What does Isaiah say? “Sing, O barren that thou didst not bear;… (Is.54:1)

In the Will of God nothing is created for itself. The earth is not singly created but in context of the heaven. If we examine the earth in detail we shall see the Lord God first set up whatever appurtenances needful for the wellbeing of Adam.

Mathematics and counting of numbers hold relevance only for man. The Alien shall have his own system of counting. When the Spirit uses numbers it with the intent of sharing the divine Will in a manner man can find use for. So what is the significance of the number 4? In the Book of Zechariah we read of four chariots (Zec.6:1) four artisans, four horns(1:18,21) These are instruments appointed by God. It is clear from so many clues how God establishes his sovereignty of history of nations.

This is adapted and modified for this blog.

Marginalia, a concise guide to the Bible is available in print and as e-book/Kindle from Amazon.com

Benny

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Whenever I look at the mirror on a grey Monday morning after a weekend binge I could crawl. The mirror of course lies. Retching and falling in drunken stupor was the night before. The mirror has had no way knowing my love with bottle. Yet when I pause before I lather I have a sneaking feeling it points an accusatory finger. I have shrunk several sizes.

The other day I was promoted over several others to the No.2 Position. When I walked past the cubicles of my former workmates, I looked at my reflection next to the cooler. I almost was blown over. I looked 10 feet tall. Till I meet my father-in law who is the numero uno. I flop instantly and have a whipped cur look. SometimesI think we human are really rubber ball or elastic that some unseen hand pull and bounce around.

My finances are nothing much but I look well heeled. Everytime  my wife palaver with women over some gala events,-it is a rehash of Real Beverly Hills housewives . Always I hear my take-home pay is grown astronomical. Whenever I mutter some cuss-words she has a laugh and tells, ” I just want to make the girls green with jealously.’ Between us we have a tacit agreement whenever she speaks of her age,- always two decades knocked out, I should keep a straight face. It is fine since a couple of drinks make me see nothing straight in the horizon nor anything in the drawing room.

Now after living through several avatars I am not sure it is plain lying or laziness to play by the cards on the table. I always have an ace up in my sleeve. Ever since in primary school I took a picture of Ronald Coleman and said it was the snapshot of my father. Unfortunately I was sitting in the class of a teacher who had played the same card before me.  He made me stand for the rest of the day holding a card LIAR. In fact I all along thought the teacher was asking me to remind him of his fib. You see my name by right is Billy Liar. It never connected. Not even this day.

Benny

 

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THE HUNTER GRACCHUS

 

Two boys were sitting on the wall by the jetty playing dice. A man was reading a newspaper on the steps of a monument in the shadow of a hero wielding a sabre. A young girl was filling her tub with water at a fountain. A fruit seller was lying close to his produce and looking out to sea. Through the empty openings of the door and window of a bar two men could be seen drinking wine in the back. The landlord was sitting at a table in the front dozing. A small boat glided lightly into the small harbour, as if it were being carried over the water. A man in a blue jacket climbed out onto land and pulled the ropes through the rings. Behind the man from the boat, two other men in dark coats with silver buttons carried a bier, on which, under a large silk scarf with a floral pattern and fringe, a person was obviously lying. No one bothered with the newcomers on the jetty, even when they set the bier down to wait for their helmsman, who was still working with the ropes. No one came up to them, no one asked them any questions, no one took a closer look at them.

 

The helmsman was further held up a little by a woman with disheveled hair, who now appeared on deck with a child at her breast. Then he moved on, pointing to a yellowish, two-story house which rose close by, directly on the left near the water. The bearers took up their load and carried it through the low door furnished with slender columns. A small boy opened a window, noticed immediately how the group was disappearing into the house, and quickly shut the window again. The door now closed, as well. It had been fashioned with care out of black oak wood. A flock of doves, which up to this point had been flying around the bell tower, came down in front of the house. The doves gathered before the door, as if their food was stored inside the house. One flew right up to the first floor and pecked at the window pane. They were brightly coloured, well cared for, lively animals. With a large sweep of her hand the woman threw some seeds towards them from the boat. They ate them up and then flew over to the woman.

 

A man in a top hat with a mourning ribbon came down one of the small, narrow, steeply descending lanes which led to the harbour. He looked around him attentively. Everything upset him. He winced at the sight of some garbage in a corner. There were fruit peels on the steps of the monument. As he went by, he pushed them off with his cane. He knocked on the door of the parlour, while at the same time taking off his top hat with his black-gloved right hand. It was opened immediately, and about fifty small boys, lined up in two rows in a long corridor, bowed to him.

 

The helmsman came down the stairs, welcomed the gentleman, and led him upstairs. On the first floor he accompanied him around the slight, delicately built balcony surrounding the courtyard, and, as the boys crowded behind them at a respectful distance, both men stepped into a large cool room at the back of the house. From it one could not see a facing house, only a bare gray-black rock wall. Those who had carried the bier were busy setting up and lighting some long candles at its head. But these provided no light. They only made the previously still shadows positively jump and flicker across the walls. The shawl was pulled back off the bier. On it lay a man with wildly unkempt hair and beard and a brown skin—he looked rather like a hunter. He lay there motionless, apparently without breathing, his eyes closed, although his surroundings were the only thing indicating that it could be a corpse.

 

The gentleman stepped over to the bier, laid a hand on the forehead of the man lying there, then knelt down and prayed. The helmsman gave a sign to the bearers to leave the room. They went out, drove away the boys who had gathered outside, and shut the door. The gentleman, however, was apparently still not satisfied with this stillness. He looked at the helmsman. The latter understood and went through a side door into the next room. The man on the bier immediately opened his eyes, turned his face with a painful smile towards the gentleman, and said, “Who are you?” Without any surprise, the gentleman got up from his kneeling position and answered, “The burgomaster of Riva.” The man on the bier nodded, pointed to a chair by stretching his arm out feebly, and then, after the burgomaster had accepted his invitation, said, “Yes, I knew that, Burgomaster, but in the first moments I’ve always forgotten it all—everything is going in circles around me, and it’s better for me to ask, even when I know everything. You also presumably know that I am the hunter Gracchus.”

 

“Of course,” said the burgomaster. “I received the news today, during the night. We had been sleeping for some time. Then around midnight my wife called, ‘Salvatore’—that’s my name—‘look at the dove at the window!’ It was really a dove, but as large as a rooster. It flew up to my ear and said, ‘Tomorrow the dead hunter Gracchus is coming. Welcome him in the name of the city.’”

 

The hunter nodded and pushed the tip of his tongue between his lips. “Yes, the doves fly here before me. But do you believe, Burgomaster, that I am to remain in Riva?”

 

“That I cannot yet say,” answered the burgomaster. “Are you dead?”

 

“Yes,” said the hunter, “as you see. Many years ago—it must have been a great many years ago—I fell from a rock in the Black Forest—that’s in Germany—as I was tracking a chamois. Since then I’ve been dead.”

 

“But you are also alive,” said the burgomaster.

 

“To a certain extent,” said the hunter, “to a certain extent I am also alive. My death boat lost its way—a wrong turn of the helm, a moment when the helmsman was not paying attention, a diversion through my wonderful homeland—I don’t know what it was. I only know that I remain on the earth and that since that time my boat has journeyed over earthly waters. So I—who only wanted to live in my own mountains—travel on after my death through all the countries of the earth.”

 

“And have you no share in the world beyond?” asked the burgomaster wrinkling his brow.

 

The hunter answered, “I am always on the immense staircase leading up to it. I roam around on this infinitely wide flight of steps, sometimes up, sometimes down, sometimes to the right, sometimes to the left, always in motion. From being a hunter I’ve become a butterfly. Don’t laugh.”

 

“I’m not laughing,” protested the burgomaster.

 

“That’s very considerate of you,” said the hunter. “I am always moving. But when I go through the greatest upward motion and the door is already shining right above me, I wake up on my old boat, still drearily stranded in some earthly stretch of water. The basic mistake of my earlier death smirks at me in my cabin. Julia, the wife of the helmsman, knocks and brings to me on the bier the morning drink of the country whose coast we are sailing by at the time. I lie on a wooden plank bed, wearing—I’m no delight to look at—a filthy shroud, my hair and beard, black and gray, are inextricably intertangled, my legs covered by a large silk women’s scarf, with a floral pattern and long fringes. At my head stands a church candle which illuminates me. On the wall opposite me is a small picture, evidently of a bushman aiming his spear at me and concealing himself as much as possible behind a splendidly painted shield. On board ship one comes across many stupid pictures, but this is one of the stupidest. Beyond that my wooden cage is completely empty. Through a hole in the side wall the warm air of the southern nights comes in, and I hear the water lapping against the old boat.

 

“I have been lying here since the time when I—the still living hunter Gracchus—was pursuing a chamois to its home in the Black Forest and fell. Everything took place as it should. I followed, fell down, bled to death in a ravine, was dead, and this boat was supposed to carry me to the other side. I still remember how happily I stretched myself out here on the planking for the first time. The mountains have never heard me singing the way these four still shadowy walls did then.

 

“I had been happy to be alive and was happy to be dead. Before I came on board, I gladly threw away my rag-tag collection of guns and bags, and the hunting rifle which I had always carried proudly, and slipped into the shroud like a young girl into her wedding dress. Here I lay down and waited. Then the accident happened.”

 

“A nasty fate,” said the burgomaster, raising his hand in a gesture of depreciation, “and you are not to blame for it in any way?”

 

“No,” said the hunter. “I was a hunter. Is there any blame in that? I was raised to be a hunter in the Black Forest, where at that time there were still wolves. I lay in wait, shot, hit the target, removed the skin—is there any blame in that? My work was blessed. ‘The great hunter of the Black Forest’—that’s what they called me. Is that something bad?”

 

“It not up to me to decide that,” said the burgomaster, “but it seems to me as well that there’s no blame there. But then who is to blame?”

 

“The boatswain,” said the hunter. “No one will read what I write here, no one will come to help me. If people were assigned the task of helping me, all the doors of all the houses would remain closed, all the windows would be shut, they would all lie in bed, with sheets thrown over their heads, the entire earth would be a hostel for the night. And that makes good sense, for no one knows of me, and if he did, he would have no idea of where I was staying, and if he knew that, he would still not know how to keep me there, and so he would not know how to help me. The thought of wanting to help me is a sickness and has to be cured with bed rest.

 

“I know that, and so I do not cry out to summon help, even if at moments—as I have no self-control, for example, right now—I do think about that very seriously. But to get rid of such ideas I need only look around and recall where I am and where—and this I can assert with full confidence—I have lived for centuries.”

 

“That’s extraordinary,” said the burgomaster, “extraordinary. And now are you intending to remain with us in Riva?”

 

“I have no intentions,” said the hunter with a smile and, to make up for his mocking tone, laid a hand on the burgomaster’s knee. “I am here. I don’t know any more than that. There’s nothing more I can do. My boat is without a helm—it journeys with the wind which blows in the deepest regions of death.”

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Marginalia in in two volumes is available as e book/kindle version.

First volume has 112 pages and priced at $3.99

Second volume has 200 pages and priced at $5.99

For those who love the word of God the author has set down a key to the mystery of the divine Will. If these revelations  are indeed from the Holy Spirit or of man is for the reader to determine. In whatever case the author has merely served as the human agency to bear testimony of the Word forever settled in heaven.

96fa4c76-9520-4cbb-83a9-c21ca9246039-200xcover e book II

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