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Archive for July 16th, 2017

Philosophy of mathematics

One plus one is two. But when you apply it to a man and woman the answer shall be always what you may not guess. A family can never be pigeonholed into simple arithmetic. What is mathematics then? No one has yet settled about the nature of mathematics.

Mathematics of numbers however are pure. The number pi for example.

In everyday life, we speak as Platonists, treating the objects of our study as real things that exist independently of human thought. If challenged on this, however, we retreat to some sort of formalism, arguing that in fact we are just pushing symbols around without making any metaphysical claims. Most of all, however, we want to do mathematics rather than argue about what it actually is. We’re content to leave that to the philosophers.

There was a time, early in the twentieth century, in which mathematicians were passionately interested in the philosophy of mathematics. People were deeply concerned about what mathematics is, what sort of existence mathematical objects have, and their opinions on these questions actually influenced the mathematics they did.

Mathematics is a human endeavour, and in every day lives we create sets of certainties to account for services we render and consumables we buy so we have a value systems to assure us certain truths of our waking lives. (When the Spirit makes use of numbers it is notable that zero is never used.) As a value system it helps man give an account of his wealth.

Thus we create wealth and set this apart for our pension funds. When we are told all that money is gone what would mean? Does it mean the value we agreed upon coinage or bonds is worthless? It would not mean that our means to accumulate the desired value are cancelled along with it? Mathematical truths are uncertain like any other truths when it is tied to human nature.

A higher truth is what I have dealt with in Marginalia, a concise guide to the Bible. Truth of the word of God is ever fixed.

Marginalia in two volumes is available as e book/kindle version.

First volume has 112 pages and priced at $3.99

Second volume has 200 pages and priced at $5.99

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