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Archive for the ‘America’ Category

Two wily foxes saw a cow munching her way through all the way to Capitol Hill. The foxes were mighty impressed. ‘Get a load of that udder?’ one fox ruddy  as they come,-  a red fox naturally, and he confidentially added, ‘bait and switch bait and switch made it at least three pails full’ The other fox  said,”We will follow her and who knows we shall be there when she drops her udder.” The fox called Rudi said, “I know I am an old hand at picking up the pieces.”

benny

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Harry Lloyd Hopkins (1890=1946) US

Social Worker, Architect of Lend Lease

Born in Iowa in 1890, after graduating from Grinnell College (1912), where he studied social work, Hopkins left for New York City and a career in the same field, rising rapidly to the administrative ranks of his profession. From 1915 to 1930 he held a wide variety of difficult high-level positions in social work, always initiating new, creative, and useful programs.

Hopkins was one of the founders of the American Association of Social Workers, the first national professional organization for social workers.

His reputation as a fine administrator reached the ear of New York‘s governor Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who brought Hopkins into his administration.

The historian, William E. Leuchtenburg, recalls: “Harry Hopkins… directed relief operations under Roosevelt in Albany. For a social worker, he was an odd sort. He belonged to no church, had been divorced and analyzed, liked race horses and women, was given to profanity and wisecracking, and had little patience with moralists… A small-town Iowan, he had the sallow complexion of a boy who had been reared in a big-city pool hall… He talked to reporters – often out of the side of his mouth – through thick curls of cigarette smoke, his tall, lean body sprawled over his chair, his face wry and twisted, his eyes darting and suspicious, his manner brusque, iconoclastic, almost deliberately rude and outspoken.”

When Roosevelt became president he recruited Hopkins to implement his various social welfare programs. As John C. Lee has pointed out: “On the whole, it is apparent that the mission of the Civil Works Administrator had been accomplished by 15th February 1934. His program had put over four million persons to work, thereby directly benefiting probably twelve million people otherwise dependent upon direct relief.

Frances Perkins later recalled: “Hopkins became not only Roosevelt’s relief administrator but his general assistant as no one had been able to be. There was a temperamental sympathy between the men, which made their relationship extremely easy as well as faithful and productive. Roosevelt was greatly enriched by Hopkins knowledge, ability, and humane attitude toward all facets of life.”

Hopkins also worked as Secretary of Commerce (1938-40). During the early stages of the Second World War he was Roosevelt’s personal envoy to Britain. Raymond Gram Swing has pointed out: “It was his position as President Roosevelt’s chief assistant in World War II that, in particular, needs to be better appreciated and valued.…In the innumerable conferences Harry Hopkins attended abroad as the President’s emissary, he was blunt of speech, adroit of mind, and dedicated to the requirements of victory.” On the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt Hopkins helped arrange the Potsdam Conference for Harry S. Truman but retired from public life soon afterwards. Harry Lloyd Hopkins died of cancer in New York City on 29th January, 1946.

(Ack: Spartacus educational.com, encyclopaedia.com)

 

 

 

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Harry S Truman (1887-1972)

33rd US President

After WWI Captain Truman was for sometime engaged in the haberdashery business. It was a failure. Later in the White House he could recall an irritating customer who could not make up his mind. Truman showed his most impressive line-up and the customer merely dithered. Truman said pointing to a couple of shirts, ‘they wear like iron. They laugh at the laundry.’

‘Yes, I know,’ grumbled the customer, ‘I bought half a dozen just like these. They came back with their sides split.’

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JOHN ADAMS Sr. (1735-1826) American

2nd US President

 

Son of a farmer and a deacon he was born to a modest family. His father expected him to become a minister, but Adams had doubts. After graduating in 1755, he decided to become a lawyer and studied law in the office of James Putnam, a prominent lawyer in Worcester. He was on the rise in his practice when Revolution intervened. He was 39 when he took his seat n the first Continental Congress (1774)and 66 when he finally returned to private life. One of his important contribution to the nation was to steer the Declaration of Independence* through congress. He served as Vice President under George Washington and later as the Second President of the new Nation, more or less continued Washington’s policy. He made the presidency the example of republican values and stressing civic virtue he followed his lead in staying out of the French and British war. Some historians consider his worst mistake was in keeping the old cabinet, which was controlled by Hamilton, instead of installing his own people, confirming Adams’ own admission he was a poor politician because he “was unpractised in intrigues for power.”

Elected by the Federalist he was more in tune with Thomas Jefferson (who was his vice President) than with Hamilton. His refusal to be drawn into a war with France while the Federalists were anti-French, cost him a second term as the president.

Note*:

Declaration of Independence

On June 7, 1776, Adams seconded the resolution of independence introduced by Richard Henry Lee that “these colonies are, and of a right ought to be, free and independent states,” and championed the resolution until it was adopted by Congress on July 2, 1776.

He was appointed to a committee with Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, to draft a Declaration of Independence. Although Jefferson primarily wrote the document It was Adam’s vigorous defense and efforts that got it passed in the Congress. Many years later, Jefferson hailed Adams as “the pillar of [the Declaration’s] support on the floor of Congress, its ablest advocate and defender against the multifarious assaults it encountered.”

 Trivia: He was the first President to occupy the White House.

 

 

(For the portrait of the President see My latest Portraits posted earlier in the day-b)

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Background for this pocket cartoon was Dr. Kissinger’s opinion that ‘the US troops for Vietnam was a mistake’. He was the architect for the nation’s foreign policy during the Nixon Years. In my view his hindsight was akin the tears of a crocodile. The terrible consequences of  the Vietnam War still reverberate and these shall keep adding to the Great Unrest of the Millennium.  benny

IMG_2783

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32nd  President of USA

In his day FDR  was the bugbear for great many who called him, a dictator, a charlatan, a grinning poseur. For others he was a friend of the poor, the champion of the minorities, the defender of Labour, the patrician saviour of Capitalism, the inspiring architect of the Allied victory and a prophet of a new world order under the aegis of the UN.

For foes and friends alike the truth remains undisputed: his impact on the modern world shall endure. When he died William S. White observed, ‘ it seemed as if history itself had died’.

A cousin of President Roosevelt, and the only son of James and Sarah Delano Roosevelt he was the quintessence of social privilege and wealth. Having passed his bar exams,he accepted in 1910 an offer  to run for the NY senate. One found him at first, ‘ a spoiled silk sort of guy. But he was amassing quietly his political capital that would when time came confound his detractors. He became assistant Secretary of the Navy under President Wilson. It proved to be his baptism of fire in the use of political strategy and of persuasion in an  executive  position.

At the Democratic convention of 1920 he was chosen as the running mate of James M.Cox from Ohio. His setback was further exacerbated by infantile paralysis in Aug,1921. It in a way gave him a new perspective, -compassion as well as steely resolve,  and while ‘lying there, he grew bigger day by day.’. The year 1924 marked his return to national politics. He became the Governor of New York( ’28). With the onset of Market crash of 1929 it was clear to him new alternatives were needed. In 1930 during his campaign for selection he promised a ‘New Deal.’ With a stunning victory he set forth a new credo of government and economy for the State of New York. His eyes were already set for Presidency since President Hoover was already beaten by the march of events. Carefully FDR prepared his moves that would lift him to the White House. His New Deal was a call to arms rather than a political campaign.For the nation’s 14 million unemployed, Roosevelt’s attack on irresponsible Corporate interests his credo constituted a thrilling new chapter in political leadership .

Inaugurated on March 4, 1933 FDR closed the banks for 4 days and his New Deal in practice showed the nation could be saved. Farmers were given a boost   with the passing of the Emergency Farm Mortgage Act, which stopped foreclosures, and authorized Federal refunding of the mortgages; on May 18, the Tennessee Valley Authority came into being; on May 27, Trust and Securities Act, House Owners Loan Corporation(June,13). In Hundred Days he had three other major Acts passed (June16)-and his New Deal was a concrete example of his vision. (To be concluded)

 

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Anita:

His-pan-ico!

By blood Lat-ino

It is OK in US of A!

Always there is a damn way

Always there are bills to pay

And the hellsapoppin!

But don’t you worry

And the sunlight streaming

And the natives steaming

Cool when the drug mules arrive

Hispanico!

By blood Latino

It is OK in US of A

girls:

I like to be in US of A

My credit always good at gunpoint

Man at the end gets the hint- pronto!

Bernardo

For a small fee in US of A

Anita

A shiv is what gets you discount

Bernardo

One look at us and they charge twice

Rosalio

But two fall when Chico whips his rod

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