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Science ever changes its boundaries and it brings in technology as well. In applying science to real time and for practical solutions it cannot do without technology. It is not man for science but science for man. Shape of technology unlike science shall consequently depend very much on man. When we hear a buzzword like technology transfer in a global context, does it not imply politics of power? How futile it is to keep arsenal of technology to any specific group we can understand from the Manhattan Project of Los Alamos in the early 40s. At the time US and allies were intent to bring WWII to a speedy conclusion. But as the goals were being met the ideological split between Capitalism and Communism became alarmingly wider. In 1945 the Allies were most seized upon technology behind nuclear warheads from falling into the hands of the Soviet Union. Soviet Union no longer exists and instead it is North Korea who is rattling a nuclear holocaust against the world. Mind you this nation was not even formed at the time.

From the above example what shall we conclude? Now you know science and technology do not speak the same language. Even so you cannot have technology without science. How does science shape up in a changing society and now globalization becoming irreversible march is a serious issue. In whichever case  its outcome shall depend very much on man’s moral sense. If man voids Cosmos of moral imperative one might well visualize science upon command jumping through the hoops of technology instead.

If thinking of man is merely to cut and dice his natural world so he may convert natural resources into dollars and cents a discipline like science has failed to do its job. Is this not what we see in our times? The earth can provide for teeming billions but not their greed as well. We may as well require two and half earths to sustain the ever increasing spiralling consumerism. Technology is the crooked shadow of science where man also casts shadow.

benny

Nigerian Scam: how a hunter obtained money from his friends and how he got out of repaying them 

Many years ago there was a Calabar hunter called Effiong, who lived in the bush, killed plenty of animals, and made much money. Every one in the country knew him, and one of his best friends was a man called Okun, who lived near him. But Effiong was very extravagant, and spent much money in eating and drinking with every one, until at last he became quite poor, so he had to go out hunting again; but now his good luck seemed to have deserted him, for although he worked hard, and hunted day and night, he could not succeed in killing anything. One day, as he was very hungry, he went to his friend Okun and borrowed two hundred rods from him, and told him to come to his house on a certain day to get his money, and he told him to bring his gun, loaded, with him.

Now, some time before this Effiong had made friends with a leopard and a bush cat, whom he had met in the forest whilst on one of his hunting expeditions; and he had also made friends with a goat and a cock at a farm where he had stayed for the night. But though Effiong had borrowed the money from Okun, he could not think how he was to repay it on the day he had promised. At last, however, he thought of a plan, and on the next day he went to his friend the leopard, and asked him to lend him two hundred rods, promising to return the amount to him on the same day as he had promised to pay Okun; and he also told the leopard, that if he were absent when he came for his money, he could kill anything he saw in the house and eat it. The leopard was then to wait until the hunter arrived, when he would pay him the money; and to this the leopard agreed. The hunter then went to his friend the goat, and borrowed two hundred rods from him in the same way. Effiong also went to his friends the bush cat and the cock, and borrowed two hundred rods from each of them on the same conditions, and told each one of them that if he were absent when they arrived, they could kill and eat anything they found about the place.

When the appointed day arrived the hunter spread some corn on the ground, and then went away and left the house deserted. Very early in the morning, soon after he had begun to crow, the cock remembered what the hunter had told him, and walked over to the hunter’s house, but found no one there. On looking round, however, he saw some corn on the ground, and, being hungry, he commenced to eat. About this time the bush cat also arrived, and not finding the hunter at home, he, too, looked about, and very soon he espied the cock, who was busy picking up the grains of corn. So the bush cat went up very softly behind and pounced on the cock and killed him at once, and began to eat him. By this time the goat had come for his money; but not finding his friend, he walked about until he came upon the bush cat, who was so intent upon his meal off the cock, that he did not notice the goat approaching; and the goat, being in rather a bad temper at not getting his money, at once charged at the bush cat and knocked him over, butting him with his horns. This the bush cat did not like at all, so, as he was not big enough to fight the goat, he picked up the remains of the cock and ran off with it to the bush, and so lost his money, as he did not await the arrival of the hunter. The goat was thus left master of the situation and started bleating, and this noise attracted the attention of the leopard, who was on his way to receive payment from the hunter. As he got nearer the smell of goat became very strong, and being hungry, for he had not eaten anything for some time, he approached the goat very carefully. Not seeing any one about he stalked the goat and got nearer and nearer, until he was within springing distance. The goat, in the meantime, was grazing quietly, quite unsuspicious of any danger, as he was in his friend the hunter’s compound. Now and then he would say Ba!! But most of the time he was busy eating the young grass, and picking up the leaves which had fallen from a tree of which he was very fond. Suddenly the leopard sprang at the goat, and with one crunch at the neck brought him down. The goat was dead almost at once, and the leopard started on his meal.

It was now about eight o’clock in the morning, and Okun, the hunter’s friend, having had his early morning meal, went out with his gun to receive payment of the two hundred rods he had lent to the hunter. When he got close to the house he heard a crunching sound, and, being a hunter himself, he approached very cautiously, and looking over the fence saw the leopard only a few yards off busily engaged eating the goat. He took careful aim at the leopard and fired, whereupon the leopard rolled over dead. The death of the leopard meant that four of the hunter’s creditors were now disposed of, as the bush cat had killed the cock, the goat had driven the bush cat away (who thus forfeited his claim), and in his turn the goat had been killed by the leopard, who had just been slain by Okun. This meant a saving of eight hundred rods to Effiong; but he was not content with this, and directly he heard the report of the gun he ran out from where he had been hiding all the time, and found the leopard lying dead with Okun standing over it. Then in very strong language Effiong began to upbraid his friend, and asked him why he had killed his old friend the leopard, that nothing would satisfy him but that he should report the whole matter to the king, who would no doubt deal with him as he thought fit. When Effiong said this Okun was frightened, and begged him not to say anything more about the matter, as the king would be angry; but the hunter was obdurate, and refused to listen to him; and at last Okun said, “If you will allow the whole thing to drop and will say no more about it, I will make you a present of the two hundred rods you borrowed from me.” This was just what Effiong wanted, but still he did not give in at once; eventually, however, he agreed, and told Okun he might go, and that he would bury the body of his friend the leopard.

Directly Okun had gone, instead of burying the body Effiong dragged it inside the house and skinned it very carefully. The skin he put out to dry in the sun, and covered it with wood ash, and the body he ate. When the skin was well cured the hunter took it to a distant market, where he sold it for much money. And now, whenever a bush cat sees a cock he always kills it, and does so by right, as he takes the cock in part payment of the two hundred rods which the hunter never paid him.

In 1998, two teams of astronomers discovered the expansion of the Universe was accelerating, rather than slowing down, as the theory at the time suggested. Physicists speculated that the acceleration was caused by something they named dark energy.

Since then, observations have indicated that dark energy and dark matter together account for 96% of the Universe. The challenge has been to find ways of studying these invisible phenomena in detail.

The Dark Energy Survey DES is the most ambitious effort to date. It began in 2004 and involves 400 scientists from 26 institutions in seven countries.

The survey involves taking pictures of 26 million galaxies across a large expanse of the sky using the Blanco telescope in Chile. To do this, the research team had to build one of the most sensitive cameras ever built. The 570-megapixel camera is capable of detecting light from galaxies that are eight billion light-years away.

By studying the way in which the light was distorted by the intervening dark matter, researchers were able to calculate its distribution. And by studying the way in which the distribution changes over time they can calculate the way in which dark energy acts on it.

The team was also able to infer the amounts of dark energy and dark matter from the density and locations of galaxies.

The results show support for previous studies that indicate the Universe is made up of 4% ordinary matter, 26% dark matter and 70% dark energy.

The hope is that a detailed study of the map will give clues about what dark matter and dark energy might be and so lead to a more complete theory of physics.

The data released today draws from just one year of observations. The researchers plan to collect data for four more years over an even larger area of the sky. Professor Ofer Lahav of University College London (UCL), and chair of the DES Advisory Board, says “Once we have the full survey, 300 million galaxies and a thousand supernovae, we may be providing input for a new Einstein to tell us what does it all mean – why is the Universe made the way it is?”(BBC news/Pallab Ghosh-Aug.3,2017)

Now you know science doesn’t have all the answers. Yet there are know nothings to deny God merely because science hasn’t found proof for Him.

 

One fine day in harvest—it was indeed Lady-day in harvest, that everybody knows to be one of the greatest holidays in the year—Tom Fitzpatrick was taking a ramble through the ground, and went along the sunny side of a hedge; when all of a sudden he heard a clacking sort of noise a little before him in the hedge. “Dear me,” said Tom, “but isn’t it surprising to hear the stonechatters singing so late in the season?” So Tom stole on, going on the tops of his toes to try if he could get a sight of what was making the noise, to see if he was right in his guess. The noise stopped; but as Tom looked sharply through the bushes, what should he see in a nook of the hedge but a brown pitcher, that might hold about a gallon and a half of liquor; and by-and-by a little wee teeny tiny bit of an old man, with a little motty of a cocked hat stuck upon the top of his head, a deeshy daushy leather apron hanging before him, pulled out a little wooden stool, and stood up upon it, and dipped a little piggin into the pitcher, and took out the full of it, and put it beside the stool, and then sat down under the pitcher, and began to work at putting a heel-piece on a bit of a brogue just fit for himself. “Well, by the powers,” said Tom to himself, “I often heard tell of the Lepracauns, and, to tell God’s truth, I never rightly believed in them—but here’s one of them in real earnest. If I go knowingly to work, I’m a made man. They say a body must never take their eyes off them, or they’ll escape.”

Tom now stole on a little further, with his eye fixed on the little man just as a cat does with a mouse. So when he got up quite close to him, “God bless your work, neighbour,” said Tom.

The little man raised up his head, and “Thank you kindly,” said he.

“I wonder you’d be working on the holiday!” said Tom.

“That’s my own business, not yours,” was the reply.

“Well, may be you’d be civil enough to tell us what you’ve got in the pitcher there?” said Tom.

“That I will, with pleasure,” said he; “it’s good beer.”

“Beer!” said Tom. “Thunder and fire! where did you get it?”

“Where did I get it, is it? Why, I made it. And what do you think I made it of?”

“Devil a one of me knows,” said Tom; “but of malt, I suppose, what else?”

“There you’re out. I made it of heath.”

“Of heath!” said Tom, bursting out laughing; “sure you don’t think me to be such a fool as to believe that?”

“Do as you please,” said he, “but what I tell you is the truth. Did you never hear tell of the Danes?”

“Well, what about them?” said Tom.

“Why, all the about them there is, is that when they were here they taught us to make beer out of the heath, and the secret’s in my family ever since.”

“Will you give a body a taste of your beer?” said Tom.

“I’ll tell you what it is, young man, it would be fitter for you to be looking after your father’s property than to be bothering decent quiet people with your foolish questions. There now, while you’re idling away your time here, there’s the cows have broke into the oats, and are knocking the corn all about.”

Tom was taken so by surprise with this that he was just on the very point of turning round when he recollected himself; so, afraid that the like might happen again, he made a grab at the Lepracaun, and caught him up in his hand; but in his hurry he overset the pitcher, and spilt all the beer, so that he could not get a taste of it to tell what sort it was. He then swore that he would kill him if he did not show him where his money was. Tom looked so wicked and so bloody-minded that the little man was quite frightened; so says he, “Come along with me a couple of fields off, and I’ll show you a crock of gold.”

So they went, and Tom held the Lepracaun fast in his hand, and never took his eyes from off him, though they had to cross hedges and ditches, and a crooked bit of bog, till at last they came to a great field all full of boliauns, and the Lepracaun pointed to a big boliaun, and says he, “Dig under that boliaun, and you’ll get the great crock all full of guineas.”

Tom in his hurry had never thought of bringing a spade with him, so he made up his mind to run home and fetch one; and that he might know the place again he took off one of his red garters, and tied it round the boliaun.

Then he said to the Lepracaun, “Swear ye’ll not take that garter away from that boliaun.” And the Lepracaun swore right away not to touch it.

“I suppose,” said the Lepracaun, very civilly, “you have no further occasion for me?”

“No,” says Tom; “you may go away now, if you please, and God speed you, and may good luck attend you wherever you go.”

“Well, good-bye to you, Tom Fitzpatrick,” said the Lepracaun; “and much good may it do you when you get it.”

So Tom ran for dear life, till he came home and got a spade, and then away with him, as hard as he could go, back to the field of boliauns; but when he got there, lo and behold! not a boliaun in the field but had a red garter, the very model of his own, tied about it; and as to digging up the whole field, that was all nonsense, for there were more than forty good Irish acres in it. So Tom came home again with his spade on his shoulder, a little cooler than he went, and many’s the hearty curse he gave the Lepracaun every time he thought of the neat turn he had served him.

Ack: Celtic Folktale

Author: Joseph Jacobs
Published: 1892
Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, London

Chinese scientists say they have “teleported” a photon particle from the ground to a satellite orbiting 1,400km (870 miles) away.

How does it work?

Simply put, teleportation is transmitting the state of a thing rather than sending the thing itself.

Some physicists give the example of a fax machine – it sends information about the marks on a piece of paper rather than the paper itself. The receiving fax machine gets the information and applies it to raw material in the form of paper that is already there.

When we read a novel we are making sense of what words of the author convey than actually see the word transform into the author’s mind. The mind may have chosen certain patterns of words since it adds to the emotional sense he wants to create. Personality of the author has already chosen them for him. The man who reads the novel has his own say in the matter, and accordingly rather than reading words rigorously (with regards to the author’s personal preferences and rationale in shaping the narrative) he makes sense of the literary space he is comfortable with.

Our mind acts somewhat like receiving fax machine makes sense of what we read. While in India my understanding of Bret Harte and Jack London stories held a certain vagueness. For a dude having lived in the kind of milieu and climate how he will make of it naturally would be closer to the real thing.

The Bible is written by inspiration of God. Inspiration of God is not lost but words in the Scripture in transmission can be misunderstood or make weak impression. The reader of the Bible requires the self-same inspiration in order to change his scepticism. His mind-set is often shaped by his cultural background and unbelieving society.

Marginalia in 2 vol. A concise guide to the Bible

Author: Benny Thomas, the Netherlands

Tags: inerrancy, sound doctrines, Faith,

 

Paperback:

Vol.1 148 pages  priced $7.00

Vol-2  265 pages   $14.25

e-books/kindle available

Vol. 1 120 pages $3.85

Vol-2 200 pages $5.06  Amazon/Kobo/Barnes&Noble/google play, Apple i-book etc.,

benny

“…But made himself of no reputation, and took upon the form of …in the likeness of men…wherefore God also hath highly exalted him….(Phil.2:7-11)”

In Christian theology ‘kenosis’ describes the role Jesus took on in order to do the complete will of God. He took the form of Servant and not as God. He laid aside that aspect in order to do the Will of the Father completely. Thus it is his human side we need focus on in order to appreciate this emptying process. We might say ‘Less is More if I have God in heaven’ is the motto what every Christian ought to aspire for. For those who preach prosperity theology and live as a celeb it is certain they have reaped their reward already. We are Christians because we trusted he lived as Son of man that is a good example to live by. If Jesus chose to give shape the Will of his Father (Phili.2:7) and not his own  we can also make a go of it here on earth. We have the model in him and faith that we have him in heaven.

In making himself no reputation he had the Father witnessing him to the world that he was his beloved Son.He was from above that made angels also interested party to watch the outcome. We read of angels ministering unto Jesus after temptation(Mt.4: 11), and it rings true. In growing to maturity in Christian life we need remember that when we are unappreciated by the world we are growing closer to our Saviour who went through this experience himself. Our trials of faith here and now are to show whether our faith be fine gold or fool’s gold.

Christ who once suffered for sins had a purpose: to bring us to God. Jesus says ‘Blessed are ye’, when your reward is denied to you. Mt.5:11.  If we are for a kingdom above and glory of commendation from the Father,  is it not useless to ask the keeper of worldly fame why no handclap from his claque?  The world receives its own. If we cannot be put to any inconvenience on account of being Christians we need check carefully if our faith be really set on the rails of salvation or not. The Bible is a route map that took our Lord to heaven.  We cannot reach there by half half from map that leads elsewhere. He was reviled in life and and also on the cross. He suffered it meekly. For he had made himself as nothing in order to retain God’s good testimony. We are on the earth and yet we have been translated for the heavens as he did. So we are biding our time here as pilgrims. Our conduct therefore calls for a life of separation, at least in mind. We are liberty to handle all things but all are neither convenient nor worth bothering about. Only make sure that we are clear in our conscience. In the epistle of St Peter we see how the world treats us has its corresponding response in heaven(1Pe.3:16)

Know what Jesus said to the Pharisees who wanted him to restrain his disciples? He said, “If these(multitude) should hold peace, the stones would immediately cry out (Lk.19:40).

Jesus set aside his own will. We read instances where God the Father sending help wherever was needed to help him keep his resolve (“The Father hath not left me alone (Jn.8:29) )”, Thus wherever we read of voice from heaven testifying ‘This is is my beloved son’ we can understand why. In the gravest crisis Jesus informs what he held at his disposal (Mt.26:53;Jn.19:11) God the Son but he stuck to his human aspect than escape the ignominious death of the cross. In him was fulfillment of the Will of the Father. He humbled himself or emptied himself thereby assuring salvation to whosoever believed in him….

(Reprinted from Guide to His Word)

Marginalia in 2 vol. A concise guide to the Bible

Author: Benny Thomas, the Netherlands

Tags: inerrancy, sound doctrines, Faith,

 

Paperback:

Vol.1 148 pages  priced $7.00

Vol-2  265 pages   $14.25

e-books/kindle available

Vol. 1 120 pages $3.85

Vol-2 200 pages $5.06  Amazon/Kobo/Barnes&Noble/google play, Apple i-book etc.,

benny

The selection from my work Marginalia explains the nature of God. Does Monotheism or Trinity explain the Lord God truthfully? Why controversy over God whom no one can see (but evidence of Him is so abundantly given throughout the Scripture) if Truth would not change the worshipper to do His commandments with all his heart and mind?. The reason is simple: each faction having presupposed the divine Nature simply want him proved right. Whose glory is on the line here mine or of God?-b  

“Let us now take up the nature of the Trinity.

Think of the Oneness of God as one whole. Why it should yield to the scrutiny of man is not so much as man is well served by the scriptures with regards to his Holiness, the Power and Wisdom. The ‪Trinity testifies the Oneness of God, each supplying necessary details to the whole while the whole in turn testifies these narratives as Truth.

We have in the Bible a few references as to the Lord God. God is a spirit (Jn.4:24). One quality of the spirit is that it can move like the wind (Jn.3:8); similarly nature of fire holds a mysterious quality both of which we can consider to our profit in order to understand the Trinity. The Lord God is a consuming fire (He.12:29). Air and Fire,- both elements we associate with God and yet there is no form that we can hold on to. The Spirit in elucidating the triune God however gives each a recognizable sign. In order to reveal God’s Jealousy we have this instance when the two sons of Aaron are punished (Le.10:1-2). What was their offense? They offered strange fire, which He commanded them not. Swift came their punishment. It brings to our remembrance the warning of the writer to the Hebrews, ‘…Holiness without which no man shall see the Lord (He.12:14).’ Purifying nature of fire being synonymous with holiness the Holy Spirit gives a symbolic value to the aspect of the Trinity.

We read God revealing himself to Abraham as well as to Moses. The presence of God is signified as a burning lamp passing between the animals Abram offered. Also significant is the passage where God was specific as to how it was to presented to him (Ge.15:9). In the burning bush that consumed not we see another manner by which His presence is indicated. Unlike the fire that consumed Nadab and Abihu we see the triune presence of God is associated by the symbol of fire. There is no indication of it being made by human hands. In contrast to this the fourth Man in the fiery furnace is made of man. Subtlety with which the Son of man is presented there is a fitting commentary of God who became man so as to understand various fiery situations we are sometime subjected in our everyday situations.

God is given a shape in the pillar of fire and cloud by day that led the children of Israel in the wilderness. Similarly in the vision of Ezekiel we see the great cloud and a great fire infolding itself,(Ez.1:4).’

In the New Testament God the spirit is given a symbol and a recognizable form as cloven tongues of fire and ‘it sat upon each of them(Ac.2:3)’. God the Spirit while presenting the God document makes a clear distinction in his characteristic style, delineating the personality of each office in the Trinity. The Oneness of the Lord God and those of the Triune God have self same essence while each in their operation quality is distinct.

 

God the Spirit puts both narratives from God the Father and from God the Son into a format where abstract ideas of divine Essence are rendered concrete in the Person and Deity of Jesus Christ. Truth is preserved. (Jn.1: 1)

Does Holy Spirit change the significance of the Will in reorganizing the Scriptural narrative? We shall see from two verses quoted here below which concerns the Holy Spirit. Jesus said ‘Wherefore I say unto you…but the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit shall not be forgiven..’(Mt.12: 31) It is evident from the quote that it is the testimony of God, the Son.

The same verse is similarly repeated which is the divine Will expressed. It is not without significance that view of the Holy Spirit is skipped. We have the testimony of Jesus for it that he ’… shall not speak of himself…’ (Jn.16: 33,8:17) Internal evidence proves the veracity of the Word as set down by Holy Spirit.”

(Selected from Chapter-8 Role of the Spirit/ Marginalia- vol.II

 

Vol.1 148 pages  priced $7.00

Vol-2  265 pages   $14.25

e-books/kindle available priced  vol. 1

120 pages $3.85 vol-2 200 pages $5.06  Amazon/Kobo/Barnes&Noble/google play, Apple i-book etc.,

Benny