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On 2017 California wildfires were in the news. In the month of December powerful winds spread Southern California fires to destroy at least 175 structures and forced more than 27,000 evacuations. These high winds even have a name. Called the Santa Anas, the dry winds typically hit in late fall and are infamous in the Golden State.

California’s biggest and deadliest fires have been propelled by Santa Ana winds, which can gust to 100 mph (161 km/h). That wind speed makes smothering fires nearly impossible, said Chief Daniel Berlant, assistant deputy director the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, which is best known as Cal Fire. “In many cases, it’s all we can do just to try to control the path of the fire, trying to keep it away from people and homes,” Berlant said. “Stopping a fire when wind is 50, 60, 70 miles per hour is almost not possible.”

He added, “These fires burn into anything that’s in their path. A wind-driven fire is like a freight train, and stopping a freight train on a dime doesn’t happen.”

Helicopters can’t drop water or flame retardants in high winds, he said, because the gusts blow the liquids away.

Santa Anas also dry out trees, shrubs and grasses, turning them into tinder and spreading the blaze, he said.

“It’s the winds that spread the embers and fan the fire,” Berlant said. “That makes the fire burn fast and jump ahead, as embers fly in the high wind.”Santa Anas occur when high pressure over the Great Basin — a vast swath of Nevada, Utah and California — compresses air, cooking it, Cal Fire Captain Mike Mohler said.

That hot air then pushes southwest toward the coast.

“Our temperatures skyrocket,” Mohler said. “Humidity decreases down to single digits.”Climate change factors also play a role. What we see now is the same old story. ((Ack:By Anne C. Mulkern, E&E News/dec.6,2017)

Right now, on the outskirts of Redding, a rampaging wildfire is doing something that was once unusual: It’s burning fast…downhill.

“Fires are burning almost as fast downhill as they burn uphill,” said Cal Fire spokesman Scott McLean, from the scene of the Carr Fire, which by midday Friday had torched more than 44,000 acres and was only 3 percent contained.

That’s not typical. One of the first things wildland firefighters learn is that fires burn much faster uphill.

It’s simple physics: heat rises, so the heat from the fire warms and dries out the upslope fuels fastest. It’s also a case of proximity: if you draw a picture of a flame on a slope, you’ll see that there’s a much shorter distance between flame and ground on the uphill side than downhill, so the fire can jump directly from one blade of grass to another.Rapidly spreading downhill fires also played a major role in last winter’s Thomas Fire. It coincided with the longest Santa Ana wind event on record, according to Nauslar of the Wine Country fires. (Ack: Allie Weill, KQED science /PBS.org of July 28,2018)
compiled by Benny

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Nearly four in 10 U.S. residents blame weather on “end times”- Dec 13, 2012
CHICAGO (Reuters) – Nearly four in 10 U.S. residents say the severity of recent natural disasters such as Superstorm Sandy is evidence the world is coming to an end, as predicted by the Bible, while more than six in 10 blame it on climate change, according to a poll released on Thursday.
The survey by the Public Religion Research Institute in partnership with the Religion News Service found political and religious disagreement on what is behind severe weather, which this year has included extreme heat and drought.
Most Catholics (60 percent) and white non-evangelical Protestants (65 percent) say they believe disasters like hurricanes and floods are the result of climate change.
But nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of white evangelical Protestants say they think the storms are evidence of the “end times” as predicted by the Bible.
Overall, 36 percent point to end times and 63 percent to climate change.
PRRI research director Daniel Cox said that some respondents – including 75 percent of non-white Protestants – believe extreme weather is both evidence of end times and the result of climate change.”
When in doubt the best bet would be on the side that does something about it. Let all come together as one and find the best ways and means to put the climate engine back on track. Oh no the pro-lifers hate liberals and the Republicans loath the Democrats and there is no way these can jump past their prejudices already raised and fenced in. More than three-quarters of Democrats and six in 10 independents believe that the weather has become more extreme over the last few years, while less than half of Republicans say they have perceived such a shift. Some bury their heads in ostrich fashion and others are counting sheep passing hazily across the blue vault they call heaven. As Cox said, “No one really knows how (end times) would look and how God would bring it about. ”
“End times? You must be joking, sir. They have not even got through their ruckus over the beginning”.
Any one for Darwinism?
benny

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