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Ali Baba of our times is a business man whom no bank would allow credit for no other reason than he never repaid any in the past. His brother Kassim did business on a grand scale and always he got credit. Why? The banks loved the very sight of Kassim who brought presents. (The manager who worked in the city office never worked in the same place for more than seven years. All presents large and small, brought by Kassim were to his own use. The manager took them and extended credit facilities yet higher). So the manager did business with alacrity and Ali Baba cried in vexation. He did a little snooping around and found he had stuck to one bank through thick and thin. But his brother Kassim could afford bamboozle the Bank A and give presents to B so he got credit from manager of B at the drop of a hat (not to mention it was the manager who dived faster than the clerk and handed it back to him). He asked his elder brother if he ever repaid his loan to the banks A or B he did business with. “Oh no what for?” Kassim was flabbergasted, “I can always go to Bank C.”
Managers like birds of passage pick whatever they get(and sticky loans finally sink into the bottom of a sea no one wants to enter) so the kingdom is bustling with activities and all agree it is great to run through figures all neatly drawn up and certified by chartered accounting firms. Greatness for them was wealth you see and it changed hands on the mantra: ‘open sesame’.
Ali Baba understood the great mystery of public finances. He became known throughout the land as the master of making great deals.

You show first what it is to be great in ways others can accept as true.
Benny

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Some 92 fables many of which never published earlier are included in the latest. Almost Aesop-Fables is available as paperback and for kindle, available worldwide through Amazon.com

What is it about?

“Aesop may not have written down any fables but does it change their quality? Nor would it matter his lowly station in life. As a slave he would have been bound to a place and to a few men for the sake of necessity. But man is more than time and place. The author in the present work is attempting to imitate and not take his place. Almost Aesop shall we say?

Only when one sits down to imitate Aesop one realizes how timeless he is.  The same drive that makes a man rise to the top now is self-same in his time.  Take the fable of The Lioness and the Frog. Mama Frog who boasts of its countless spawn is no different than a man who struts about millions all in stock. The lioness would find her cubs though a few sufficient to make all sit up and notice. Such is solid fame. The nameless inventor of wheels did not patent his invention but think of the march of progress without him? Solid fame is what makes your relevance count even after your lifetime. It is your calling card to posterity.

Almost Aesop carries life experience in some 80 + fables sprinkled with illustrations from the author.

Almost Aesop is a companion volume to the Life of Aesop also available through Amazon.com

Here is the cover.

Almost_Aesop__Fable_Cover_for_Kindle

Benny

 

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The_Life_of_Aesop_Cover_for_KindleCreatespace ID: 7805832

The life of Aesop is available through Amazon.com

paperback and for kindle. cover design ‘Iris’.

Benny

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Eldorado Or Bust? ©

 

An intrepid traveller went into Eldorado and he was surprised that the roads were paved with gold and no one seemed to take any notice of it. Gold nuggets were thrown in heaps as gravel in his own land and the inhabitants went about their chores carrying firewood and breadfruit in baskets woven with banana leaves. All the more amazed was he to notice man and woman were naked and they did not seem to bother with the great wealth heaped about them as if with an indifferent hand. He approached one man and managed to make himself understood. He wanted to speak with his chief. He smiled and led him to a hut erected with utmost simplicity a spacious hall unadorned except for a raised platform. At the centre was a three legged stool and a Panama hat. The visitor would have burst out laughing had it not been for a number of locals who were standing before it with gravity.

He murmured to his escort where the chief stood among them. The cicerone without any change of expression said, “Our chief rests on his stool.”

“But why those six standing before it and in solemnity?

“They are taking counsel from Great Chief and what they decide there they accept as coming from him.”

“Don’t you want your voice heard?”

“What for?” the local said in amazement, “ We live in peace with ourselves and we have nothing to complain; nothing to improve our lot since nature takes care what we cannot.”

Later the visitor after careful study of their manner of running their daily affairs without much trouble and in the amity that existed among them he realized the Chief exerted a great influence upon their lives even without stirring from the spot.

Politics is the art of the impossible concept made to look as possible. The idea that one better and more schooled in public affairs can better your condition is sold by fellows who have nothing to be happy with themselves so they create a smokescreen of their superiority. Not having anything worth in themselves they sell you a pie in the sky. Poitics is for the gullible who shall not be content with themselves. Look at the social history of nations. Which nation can justify that they have found a leader who created Eldorado or made happiness their lot?

benny

 

 

 

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dophin

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Sorry, the story continues in Almost Aesop, Fable available through Amazon.com-b

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Illustration from The Life of Aesop

(Aesop at the age of 12 is brought to the House of Iadmon, a Samoan and he wants to find out more about his new purchase.-b)
Next day Iadmon called Aesop to a room where beautiful musical instruments were kept. “Boy, I am in a mood to be entertained. What instrument will you choose?” There were many wind and stringed instruments. Aesop took a cither saying, “Oh my last master loved this. He would play on for hours.” He expressed he was sorry he did not take up music lessons then.
“So my choice has to be this.” Aesop had a flute in his hands and he made such strange sounds with it. His master winced and stopped him. “Why didn’t you tell me you are such a dunce with a flute?” “Oh master I spared you from my rendition of ‘Oh the mists of Olympus’ on a cither. Had you heard me you certainly would have complimented me to say: ‘I have a way with the flute.’ ”
The master had a hard time to contain his laughter. Managing a very grave demeanor he said, “‘If I ever hear you play flute within my earshot you shall be sorry.” He waved the young slave away.

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