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Posts Tagged ‘Inner life’

(1883-1924) Czech

writer

Kafka was born into a middle-class, German-speaking Jewish family in Prague, the capital of the Kingdom of Bohemia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He trained as a lawyer, and after completing his legal education he was employed with an insurance company, forcing him to relegate writing to his spare time. Over the course of his life, Kafka wrote hundreds of letters to family and close friends, including his father, with whom he had a strained and formal relationship. He died in 1924 at the age of 40 from tuberculosis.

In order to understand Kafka I shall do well to include a quote from his diary and an anecdote. The significant diary entry from August 1916: “My penchant for portraying my dreamlike inner life has rendered everything else inconsequential; my life has atrophied terribly, and does not stop atrophying.”

When Kafka was reading aloud the opening pages of The Trial before a group of Prague friends but laughed so much that he had to stop at intervals, while his listeners also laughed “uncontrollably,” despite what his friend Max Brod described as “the terrible gravity of this chapter.”

He complained often of being a martyr to his art, a self -realization that speaks of his sharp intellect but his irony in the face of the tragic fate of his protagonist, to burst out into laughter, sets the relevance of literature in his case as a nervous twitch set off by inanity of his times and his ideals. Literature has thus served her votaries each after its fashion. Everyday life about Kafka was giving way

as the father-figure you revered sliding into senescence and certainties about the hearth sounding false as the unfortunate masses of migrants you see on your screen daily shuffling about in the streets. Europe coming to terms with itself in a post-world war was all too real and as it were hell itself.

‘His conception of himself as tormented artist is allied closely to his view of his predicament as a man struggling to maintain his health and sanity in the face of an unrelentingly inhospitable world. In the annals of lamentation, from Job and Jeremiah to Beckett’s Unnamable, surely no one has devoted himself to the sustained moan with such dedication, energy, and exquisite finesse as the author of the “The Judgment” and the “Letter to His Father,” of the diaries, and of the correspondence with Felice Bauer and his lover Milena Jesenská, as well as his friend Max Brod’.1

Consider the prose fragment “The Great Wall of China.” The piece focuses not on the emperor on whose orders the wall was constructed, but on the construction itself, which was built “not as a single entity but rather in individual sections far apart from one another,” No one apart from those in the top command can say with any certainty how far the construction has progressed; it is not even clear whether the wall will really have all the gaps filled in when the work is done. It is never completed, and remains a fragment made up of fragments.

His journey into the self was a fragment made up of fragments and when a cry breaks out, no one shall know whether out of helplessness or of joy it assails us and prepares for similar surprises to come if the reader only persists enough. That fragmentary aspect, a student in literature in retrospect may accept or be dismissive about, but has despite of Kafka’s irony become a literary term –Kafkesque.

Quote: : “I am made of literature; I am nothing else and cannot be anything else.”

1. Brod, though mistaken in some things—his representation of Kafka as a religious writer, for instance—was ever commonsensical. He largely had the measure of his friend, and even after Kafka had been diagnosed with tuberculosis did not hesitate to write to him with a flat rebuke: “You are happy in your unhappiness.”

(A Different Kafka- John Banville/NYT Oct.23,2013)

 

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All art is nature plus. Power to  transcend simple living to live better from resources within and in relation to what others represent is to give nature a new mode to choose from. For me it defines an art of living. Diogenes  of Sinope had learnt it by which he could convince Alexander the Great he was as great as he. Alexander had gone about in conquering without while he went into his life within.

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( This post is reprinted from my post http://obi4b.wordpress.com/2010/10/03/free-from-above/ The blog is titled Guide to his Word where I post commentaries on the word of God. You may want to check it out. My approach to the Bible is from a non-sectarian standpoint. b)
Gen1:16′God made two great lights-…and also stars.’

Here we see the mention of lights but with special reference to the sun, moon and stars. We also have a clue supplied by God the Spirit: these are set in the expanse of the sky as signs. Purpose of such signs is two-fold. This serves as a marker for seasons, days and years. Secondly such signs explain the divine Will where it concerns us. For a skeptic the origin of the heavenly bodies must explain in such manner his rational mind can accept as correct. For a child of God reason must address his body and spirit as well. Hence emphasis shall vary than for a skeptic. For the former righteousness means being obedient to his Will the emphases of the sun, moon and stars as signs must add to his knowledge in the spirit or in his inner man, to use a scriptural expression. Holy Spirit has recorded the creation account so that such signs can serve as tool to unlock the mysteries of God. One fifth of the Scriptures concern with prophesies of some sort. Hence the heavenly bodies as signs hold weight and relevance to a Christian regardless of whatever persuasion.

In the Book of Revelation we read of a woman clothed with the sun Rev.12. The sun serves as a clue, a sign. As with celestial bodies numbers also hold significance. Holy Spirit must hold special significance as we saw with names, in giving a number of 1260 days (Rev12:6) as distinct from a statement in in Genesis’-And there was evening, and there was morning -the fourth day(1:19).’ Holy Spirit in putting the record straight or setting God’s Will in signs or symbols is striking a warning. Literal interpretation may not be what Holy Spirit has in mind, It is to be revealed in God’s time. 1260 would be roughly three and a half years. Would it therefore hint the earthly ministry of Jesus or something else? Science can only be appreciated with strict application of reason; no less is expected of a child of God. His spirit or inner man shall not be sustained or edified by errors. This note of caution must be sounded whenever we handle the Word. For example note what Spirit says:’Let him that hath understanding count..for it is the number of a man, and his number is six hundred three score and six (Rev13:18).’ Even here instances are not wanting in the way Bible teachers have in the past cited the names of Nero, Napoleon, Saddam Hussein et al to denigrate them. God the Spirit does not want man to cast all restraints in interpreting the Word of God with a spirit of pride. In studying the word of God, we require wisdom and it is not earthly kind.( Jas3:14-18,13) We have the assurance of God that wisdom to understand his Word is from God (Jas.1:5).

benny

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Any act, be it of human beings, animals, plant life has to be in direct context of Truth. It is not without purpose that every thing of our universe connects with every thing else.
Everything naturally connects on a common yardstick of Truth. Both Physical and Spirit world.
2.
Energy is the currency with which Truth keep track of every exchange in Cosmos.
It stands to reason that what I lose out here on the Earth is compensated in the hereafter with energy levels. It would be in a way fair and equitable that the man who stole my goods and went free, pays back with interest of course energy that I can make use of hereafter. This point was already illustrated in A Hereafter Story.
Justice in the lexicon of Truth must hold a different time factor than we hold here and now.
benny

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Creation Spirit©

As soon as God created Day and Night, the host of angels came to God and asked, “O Lord there is division among us. Which of the two, Day or Night is better?” God chose not to reply. The day He separated the Heaven from the Earth the angels came and asked,” Which is better, heaven or the earth?”Again God remained silent. He went on creating and after he had created man the angels in so many groups asked,” We are going to pieces with contrary opinions. Tell us God, Are we not better than the man you created?”
God fell silent. Archangel prodded,” O Lord of hosts! If man were better you would have set him here in heavenly places. Now we see your face all the time and we are definitely superior.”
Instead of replying God breathed in to Adam and asked” Which is better- I being among you or my spirit in him? Answer me and I shall answer those questions you asked me earlier.”
benny

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No great monument like the Pyramids of Cheops could have been built on the levels of energy of the ruling class alone. So the powers-that-be hit upon an idea that would electrify the masses. A belief in afterlife and the pharaoh as a celestial symbol made it all possible.
Think of every life form having equal share to energy that is a constant. Isn’t that wealth even though that may not be counted in dollars, pounds or in Euros? Who holds all that wealth?
benny

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