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Posts Tagged ‘welfare state’

(1863-1945)
Who is the greatest British political figure in the twenty century? Winston Churchill or David Lloyd George? Historians are divided over this though in their political career they were considered as terrible twins. Both had switched sides and had facility with words to mask their real intents.
Lloyd George had an instrumental attitude to political parties. Parties were there to achieve objectives, they were not ends in themselves. But such an attitude made him widely distrusted. He had actually proposed a coalition to the Unionists in 1910 when there were inter-party talks over the constitutional crisis.
he was not the leader of the Liberal Party and depended heavily upon the support of the Unionists. And for all his energy, dynamism, and popularity with the public, he failed to get control of the army. He could not get rid of General Haig though he bitterly opposed the heavy loss of manpower in Flanders in 1917. In the 1918 general election Lloyd George led the coalition to a landslide victory, but it was largely a Unionist majority and many in the party had little loyalty to him. The divided Liberals did badly and Labour became the official opposition. Lloyd George’s plans to fuse the Unionists and his own Liberal followers into a new centre party came to nothing.(oxford dictionary of political bio: DLG)
Rejection of his controversial “People’s Budget” (to raise taxes for social programs) in 1909 by the House of Lords led to a constitutional crisis and passage of the Parliament Act of 1911. He devised the National Insurance Act of 1911, which laid the foundation of the British welfare state.
The Welsh Wizard also could be so wrong, as it is seen in his view of Hitler as a threat to Peace.
On 22nd September 22, 1933, Lloyd George declared in a speech at Barmouth: “If the Powers succeed in overthrowing Nazism in Germany, what would follow? Not a Conservative, Socialist or Liberal regime, but extreme Communism. Surely that could not be their objective. A Communist Germany would be infinitely more formidable than a Communist Russia.” 

In September 1936 Lloyd George visited Adolf Hitler in an attempt to persuade him not to stop taking military action in Europe. After his arrival back in Britain he wrote in the Daily Express : “I have now seen the famous German leader and also something of the great change he has effected. Whatever one may think of his methods – and they are certainly not those of a Parliamentary country – there can be no doubt that he has achieved a marvellous transformation in the spirit of the people, in their attitude towards each other, and in their social and economic outlook. One man has accomplished this miracle. He is a born leader of men. A magnetic dynamic personality with a single-minded purpose, a resolute will, and a dauntless heart.”
Although Lloyd George agreed that Germany had been badly treated after the First World War, he was opposed to the British government’s policy of appeasement.
David Lloyd George died on 26th March, 1945.((Spartacus study notes)

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A welfare state is founded on the principle that the state plows back some of its accumulated strengths from the combined force of its people.It takes the form of services and also financial help on the assumption that in any society some 15% are likely to go under and consequently may drag the rest with it if some kind of coordinated support is not given in time. It is not charity but prudence to keep the morale of the people in certain temper that keeps the state to go about its business. Even an underprivileged citizen on welfare can be put to use in an emergency: war, fire or plague. If his life is not worth considering by state in good times it cannot expect his or her support in bad times.
It is the fault of the state if it cannot put its member of the state to good use.
A hellfare state is where the state works on the seemingly sound principle of letting the brightest and the cleverest special privileges like tax cuts (for those who don’t need them-super rich, I mean) incentives for entrepreneurs to control the workforce to do their bidding. More likely than not the brightest or cleverest would prove to be enemies to state if necessity arises, to save their own wealths than meet the danger the state may be facing.
Now to my main subject.
Those who invested in Iceland were not looking for the welfare of the country but worked purely on the principle of greed. When Iceland faced economic slump it let foreign investors and runaway banks ( chasing after profits whether on sound banking principles or not) also share some of the blame. Whereas Ireland seems to make the taxpayers suffer for letting those pushed up economic bubble beyond sustainable levels. When the banks went bust who are to be penalized people or the banks?
Here is a joke. What is the difference between Iceland and Ireland? Oh just a letter r. It is often the case whenever one falls one is more likely to land on the head or on the r’s.
benny

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Aneurin Bevan (1897-1960)
Is he still relevant? I think so. Especially when in America medicare is still an explosive issue.
The collective principle asserts that… no society can legitimately call itself civilised if a sick person is denied medical aid because of lack of means.
—Aneurin Bevan, In Place of Fear, p100
On the “appointed day”, 5 July 1948, having overcome political opposition from both the Conservative Party and from within his own party, and after a dramatic showdown with the British Medical Association, which had threatened to derail the National Health Service scheme before it had even begun, as medical practitioners continued to withhold their support just months before the launch of the service, Bevan’s National Health Service Act of 1946 came into force. After 18 months of ongoing dispute between the Ministry of Health and the BMA, Bevan finally managed to win over the support of the vast majority of the medical profession by offering a couple of minor concessions, but without compromising on the fundamental principles of his NHS proposals. Bevan later gave the famous quote that, in order to broker the deal, he had “stuffed their mouths with gold”. Some 2,688 voluntary and municipal hospitals in England and Wales were nationalised and came under Bevan’s supervisory control as Health Minister.
Anecdote:
When he was Britain’s minister of Health, he returned home each night with cabinet papers and retreated to a small top bed room with them. Once he called late in the night for his second brief case as bulging with sheaves of papers as before.
At this his wife remonstrated, ‘No’ said she, ‘One you may take. But taking two to bed is positively immoral.’
benny

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